Resources

 

Books and On-Line Resources

 

There are many books and on-line resources available for those with a terminal illness and the people who care for them as professionals and as volunteers. The list provided here is probably more suited to those wishing to volunteer in the hospice setting and is in no way intended to be a complete list. As a user of this site you may recommend additional resources that you have found helpful.

 

  • Being with the Dying (2008) by Joan Halifax
  • Dark Night to Gentle Surrender (2010) by Patricia Kobielus Thompson
  • Final Gifts (2008) by Maggie Callahan and Patricia Kelley
  • In the Midst of Life (2011) by Charlie Rose
  • Talking About Death Won´t Kill You (2001) by Virginia Morris
  • Soul Service (2013) by Robert Cowgill M.D. and Christine Cowgill
  • The Four Things That Matter Most (2004) by Ira Byock
  • The Hospice Walk (2003) by Ginger Alvarez
  • The Volunteers Non-Medical Novel (2013) By Clark Goodrich
  • When Autumn Comes (2006) by Mary Jo Bennett

 

Trainer´s Favorites (for what they do not say as much as what they say: these older publications are recommended to help the individual discover his/her own feelings about the dying process).

 

  • I Heard the Owl Call my Name (1980) by Margaret Craven
  • Tuesdays with Morrie  (1997) by Mitch Albom

 

The following sites have information that can be applied to hospice, palliative and respite care wherever it is practiced:


National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization
http: www.nhpco.org/about/hospice_care


Canadian Virtual Hospice
http: www.virtualhospice.ca/enUS/Main+Site

 

Dying Person's Bill of Rights

 

I have the right to be treated as a living human being until I die.

 

I have the right to maintain a sense of hopefulness, however changing its focus may be.

 

I have the right to be cared for by those who can maintain a sense of hopefulness, however changing it may be.

 

I have the right to express my feelings and emotions about my approaching death in my own way.

 

I have the right to participate in decisions concerning my own care.

 

I have the right to expect continuing medical and nursing attention even when "cure" goals must change to "comfort" goals.

 

I have the right not to die alone.

 

I have the right to be free of pain.

 

I have the right to have my questions answered honestly.

 

I have the right not to be deceived.

 

I have the right to have help from and for my family in accepting my death.

 

I have the right to die in peace and dignity.

 

I have the right to retain my individuality and not be judged for my decisions, which may be contrary to the beliefs of others.

 

I have the right to discuss and enlarge my religious and spiritual experiences, whatever these may mean to others.

 

I have the right to expect that the sanctity of the human body will be respected after death.

 

I have the right to be cared for by caring, sensitive, knowledgeable persons who will attempt to understand my needs and will be able to gain some satisfaction in helping me face my death.

 

Created at a workshop ¨The Terminally Ill Patient and the Living Person" in Lansing, Michigan Conducted by Amelia J Barbers, Associate Professor of Nursing - Wayne State University.